Tuesday, July 25, 2006

# 0251Total Allotment Time: 2 & 3/4 hrs.
Principle Tasks: Lightly forking over soil newly exposed from under plastic sheeting to remove any remaining weed roots as in recent posts.

8 comments:

Jimmy said...

HI Tim

Walnuts? How big do they grow? The trees I mean. I have never seen one up here so I imagine they do not like the cold too much. They do look rather healthy but as you say better get them into their final site in the autumn or they will become pot bound.

I notice the cabbage is very tight-headed so I suspect that by unwrapping a few outer leaves from the less well developed ones will still offer a rewarding crop. I have to ask - how many do you need? I expect you would struggle to eat a whole one and by the time you have eaten 4 a month will have passed? Successional planting is the key to getting it right. Just do not ask me how to do it, I don't know as I always had a glut of everything in my gardening days. Please spare our endangered butterflies, live and let live - do not net!

On the following subject - apostrophies:

I will ask my wife as she always knows. I too have agonised over the logic for years. I would comment however that panoramic is an adjective and should be used as follows: Today’s panoramic view is taken from the corner. Or used as a nour:Today’s panorama is taken from the corner.

In both cases I still have no idea whether there ought to be that apostrophy or not. I will look on the web till my wife returns.

Regards
Jimmy

Jimmy said...

Hi Tim

PS the apostrophy - it has all come back to me: http://www.apostrophe.fsnet.co.uk/

This site will explain all with examples and it is quite comprehensive. So it ought to be:

Todays panorama is taken from the corner.

Otherwise it would be:

Today is panorama is taken from the corner.

Hope this helps.

Regard
Jimmy

Jimmy said...

Hi Tim

My wife has returned and the correct answer is:

Today’s panorama is taken from the corner.

The reason is that the panorama belongs to today. I think mathematics is easier.

Regards
Jimmy

Rita M said...

The six nuts saplings in pots are looking great and verry healty - I hope you find good places for them .
20 years ago I also had a sapling and now he is a verry nice tree .... with nuts.
Rita

Tim said...

Big, is the easy answer there, Jimmy :o) The one I collected the nuts from must easily be over 40ft high. They've naturalised here in the sunny south. Here's a link a site detailling them: http://www.the-tree.org.uk/BritishTrees/TreeGallery/walnutc.htm

I recently potted them on, so I'm hoping they will be okay as they are until they drop their leaves in the autumn. This will be the best time for planting them out I think (a bit naughty, I know, to go and plant them in the wild, but the scrubland you can see in the distance of some of the panoramas might well be where they end up if the charity garden doesn't want them). They really need a large garden. I just couldn't stop myself from potting them up when I noticed they'd germinated :o)

hmm.. I still would argue over the endangered status of Cabbage White butterflies in the south of England (they do seem by far the most common kind - the wild cabbage grows in abundance along our white cliffs). Do you know if brassicas are the food plant of any other butterfly or moth? I'll be far more open to leaving a few uncovered in the future if I knew this was the case.

Also, it would help the butterfly and moth population far better if we (the nation) phased out intensive farming methods and encouraged a return to organic farming. It should be far more widely known that since the chemical revolution of the 1940's/50's we've seen a 75% decline in them (along with a 95%, yes, a 95%, decline in our wildflower meadows!). These statistics are from bona-fide sources (English Nature and UK Moths).

Double also :o) there are other plant species that I am and will grow (like the Phacelia and Vervain) that are good for butterflies and moths, so it would be unfair to say that by not allowing caterpillars access to the cabbages, that I'm not 'doing my bit' to help them.

Avoiding gluts! :o) (I picked 3 kilos of French Beans on monday!) This will be a priority for me, yes. I'm thinking of joining a seed-sharing scheme wherin I shall hope to grow older varieties of plants which are far less uniform than todays F1 hybrids. Hopefully this will mean that I have different plants, of different sizes, developing at different times. This, along with staggered sowing, should help avoid a repeat of the beans (pardon the pun) :o)

Ahh.. 'Panoramic view' - I get it! 'Today's panorama' - it is then! Cheers!

Best Regards,
Tim :o)x

Tim said...

Thanks, Rita. Yes, they really are beautiful trees, Walnuts, and I'll be so pleased to know if any of mine survive into adulthood. A positive legacy if ever there was one! :o)

Regards,
Tim :o)x

Jimmy said...

Hi Tim

Thanks for the comprehensive response - I have decided I do not want a walnut tree, they grow too big. Speaking of which I have just watched my neighbour spend 3 weeks trying to fell and then dig out the roots of one of those Leylandii trees. He really struggled and he had a chain saw!

With reference to the other insects which like brassicas - I could lie and say all sorts but to be honest I do not know of any others. So mesh it must be.

Are you close to the White Cliffs then? I once stood on Cap Gris on the French side of the Channel and looked back and thought "what am I doing here?", but as I turned to cycle on the notion never returned and I spent a very enjoyable 6 weeks touring aroung the whole of the northern half of France. As far south as the Loire Valley. They have wonderful globe artichokes over there though I have never tasted one.

I agree wholeheartedly that the agricultural revolution after the war has done a lot to kill of all the interesting fields and wildlife. I have seen quite a change over the years to particular fields I can remember wandering through. Two in particular - one in Ayrshire where we once went for a picnic, overgrazed. The other in Argyllshire where we went on holiday had heather - on returning it is now a monoculture of grass and the whole farm has been "improved". Progress, but a terrible loss to nature and to us.

I quite like your idea of growing older varieties and don't forget the rhubarb! An indespensible fruit/veg (whichever it is?).

Just in case you do not know - do not boil rhubarb in an aluminium pan as it disolves the aluminium and causes health problems. I think I am right in saying Alzheimer's. Note the apostrophy, as it belonga him.

Jimmy

Tim said...

Cheers, Jimmy. It must of caught me in one of my more loquacious moods :o)

> Are you close to the White Cliffs then?

My mum lives in Dover (where she was born n' bred) which is about a half an hour train ride away from Faversham. If you take a peek at my other blog (find via profile) you'll find a couple of orchid pics I took on a recent family walk there. Do you come across any nearby you? (I remember seeing them growing on the Shetlands, so you shouldn't be too far north). Possibly my most favorite plants these.

Thanks for the reminder over the rhubarb (I'll have to check my mum knows of this). I was given an un-named variety earlier this year, which I've been keeping in a pot, but I might well (in reference to tonight's post) give it away, in preference for a known kind - adds something to the magic of the thing, I feel.

Regards,
Tim :o)x